Episode 18: Can Your Pet See Colors, and the Owner Gender Difference

So often we want to describe the way our pets see as simply a black and white version of what we see, but that simply is not true. Pets do not see all the colors we do, but dogs can see basically two colors, a blue-violet and a yellow-green, while cats, who can see shades of gray better than dogs, can also see blue and yellow. The pet’s tapetum, which is a reflective surface on the back of the eye, allows pets to see better, though less distinctly, at night. This tapetum also causes the odd colors to appear in pictures. while human’s lack of a reflective tapetum leads to “red eye.”

SuSzuNanuJoerss

Su Szu and Nanu Joerss, demonstrating reflective tapetums and humping

 

Eme and Nyah

Eme and Nyah

 

Beyond colors, dogs and cats simple process the images differently than we humans do. The first processing center of vision, which is located in front of the retina’s rods and cones (which detect light), are set up differently. While humans are designed to to edges, dogs and cats are designed to see horizontal movement, such as a rabbit running across the ground.

retina

 

This processing center in humans can be tricked, which is how optical illusions are designed. With complex patterns of colors, we can send these processing cells into a feedback loop, making it look like a picture is moving, even when it is not.

03-wd0909-Optical-Illusions-2

 

05-wd0909-Optical-Illusions-2

John and Dr. Rumore also discuss how a man’s deeper voice is more suited for reprimanding a pet, while a higher pitched voice is better at praising a pet. These voice tones can lead to trouble men and women train puppies, or even adult dogs.

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Listen to Episode 18: Can Your Pet See Colors, and the Owner Gender Difference

Episode 17: Drug Reactions, The News, and It May NOT be Hip Dysplasia

MicrophoneDr. Rumore gets interviewed, and blatantly taken out of context, when interviewed by his local news station. The issue involved dru reactions and Trifexis, and just goes to show how what you read online, or see on television, may not be the whole truth.

Update: WFLA has edited their original story online, and removed the out-of context quote. Thanks!!

Here’s the story.

John also asks about the trifecta, which is a bet in horseracing, and not a heartworm preventative.

John and Dr. Rumore also discuss hip dysplasia, and the tings that can look very similar. We all think of arthirits in the hips of big dogs, but  90% of cats over the age of 12 have arthritis.  They also discuss how long term aspirin use may make arthritis worse, but Chondroiton and Glucosamine can help. Stem cell therapy and hip replacements can help as well, but are much more expensive.

Using pill guns to give pills to cats was mentioned, as well as thyroid disease in Dr. Rumore’s cat Scully, and how cat’s may maintain their muscle mass by purring.

They also discussed the placebo effect, and how it makes testimonials a bad way to judge supplements.

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Listen to Episode 17: Drug Reactions, The News, and It May NOT be Hip Dysplasia

Episode 16: The 8 Things You Need to Do for Your Pet This Summer

ecoverusblog-com

Thanks EcoverUSBlog.com

1. Warmer temperatures can lead to scary weather. Be ready if you must evacuate or hunker down for a storm. Have food, water and a way to contain your pets handy if needed. And please, please, please REGISTER YOUR FREAKIN’ MICROCHIP!

2. Please get them on a heartworm prevention, and make sure what you are using is effective against heartworms.

3. Be ready for allergies as the pollens start to bloom. See Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food for some hints on how to deal with allergies.

4. Start your flea prevention before they hit hard. See how fleas mimic the movie Aliens in Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies.

Once again, where dogs who have fleas typically itch

Once again, where dogs who have fleas typically itch

 

Where cats who have fleas typically itch

Where cats who have fleas typically itch

5. Be careful of poisonous critters, such as rattlesnakes and bufo toads.  We mention the rattlesnake vaccine, and some of the controversy surrounding it.

6. Pools can be dangerous for kids and pets. Make sure your pet has a way to get out of your pool, such as a ramp.  We also discussed rhabdomyolysis.(your big word for the day).

7. The heat can be deadly. Dogs and cats can only sweat through their footpads and nose, so heatstroke is much more likely in a hot car. We also mentioned Mexican Hairless dogs and Sphinx cats.

8. Antifreeze can be deadly- be careful with flushing or leaks.

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Listen to Episode 16: The 8 Things You Need to Do for Your Pet This Summer

Episode 15: The Reality of Food Allergies and the Big Pet Food Scare

DogFoodAllergiesFood allergies do exist, and can cause significant discomfort for some pets. Pet foods have vastly oversimplified pet itchiness, often making everything related to grains in foods. Grain allergies do exist, but are much less common than allergies to meats. Which meat depends on the individually pet, and also has no relation to the quality of the meat. If your dog is allergic to chicken, he or she is allergic to all-organic human-grade* chicken breast as well.

* see Episode 8 to learn what this term really means.

Fleas on a Dog

When dogs have fleas, they tend to itch here.

Dogs with food allergies tend to itch here

Dogs with food allergies tend to itch here

Also remember, not all itchiness is food allergies. Allergies to pollens and other things in the environment are common, as well as fleas or other parasites, such as ear mites.

Fleas_on_cat

Cats with fleas tend to itch and get scabs here.

FoodCat

Cats that have food allergies can itch anywhere

Dr. Rumore and John go into depth about the big pet food recall scare of 2007, which was related to melamine put into wheat gluten. We also speak briefly about why some people have to avoid wheat gluten as well.

Hydrolyzed diets can be used to help with food allergies as well. These diets “cut up” the protein molecules so that antibodies and the pet’s immune system can not react to them.

The Kangaroo Diet made by Eukanuba was mentioned.

The Pet’s in the News segment talked about a study showing that limited ingredient pet foods are often contaminated with other ingredients  and how this can make treating food allergies very frustrating.

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Listen to Episode 15: The Reality of Food Allergies and The Big Pet Food Scare

Episode 13: Why Your Pet Likes Eating Grass

for those of you who missed it the first time (yes iTunes, I’m talking to you.)

If you’re a person, just look down for the actual post.

Episode 14: Why, and How, Cats Purr and Cold Wet Noses

John and Boogie

John and Boogie

John and Dr. Rumore jump into how and why cats purr, and whether they could be using their purr to heal themselves, and possible others. They also discuss cold wet noses, what they really mean, and better ways to see if your pet is sick. They discuss checking the mucous membranes (gums) and capillary refill time (CRT).  Lastly, the dangers of Gorilla Glue!

For more infomation- See More Episode 14: Why, and How, Cats Purr and Cold Wet Noses

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Listen to Episode 14: Why, and How, Cats Purr and Cold Wet Noses

Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Dog Eating GrassSome dogs and cats seem almost obsessive about eating grass. John and Dr, Rumore discuss why, whether you need to worry about it, and how to slow them down if your pets love of lawn salad is getting too excessive.

If you are trying to add some fiber to your pet’s diet, dogs tend to like canned green beans, carrots (fresh, frozen and canned), romaine leaves, or apples. Avoid garlic and onions, as they can cause anemia is dogs and cats.

We talk a fair amount about herbicides and cancer risks in dogs. If you want more information:

Here is the link to the Purdue study that shows the bladder cancer risk with herbicides and Scotties.

Here is the link to an article about the herbicide 24D and cancer in dogs.

Here is the link to the response from the manufacturer of 24D, refuting the cancer study.

The ASPCA Poison Control Center has much information about which plants in your house and yard may be toxic.

Cat Eating Grass

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Listen to: Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

No Visine for PetsWhat it means when your pet has goopy eyes, and what you can do at home, and when you need to get to veterinarian as soon as possible. Things never to use- contact lens cleaner, Visine, ClearEyes or similar in your pet’s eyes. We talk about entropion and ectropion, both are disorders of the eyelids. We also discuss Keratoconjuctiva Sicca (dry eye) and how to properly treat Cherry Eyes.

Some pictures of eyes are coming- if injured eyes gross you out, you have been warned!

Entropion (Thanks Wikipedia!) The eyelashes are rubbing on the eyeball, causing the eye to turn blue and brown with irritation.

Ectropion in a Cocker Spaniel (thanks Wikipedia). The eyelids are drooping too low, preventing this dog from blinking properly.

Cherry Eye- Don’t Cut that Off! The tear gland of the third eyelid is inflamed and prolapsed.

Dr. Rumore’s wife finds a lost beagle, and the importance of microchips, and registering them, is highlighted. If you need to find out which company maintains your pet’s microchip registry, you can look it here.

Microchip and Rice Grain- From How Stuff Works

John changes his name from John Siposawardwinningtalkjournalist to Johnny Edge, or maybe Shannon. We also discuss how to say “shmushed up face” in latin (brachiocephalic).

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Listen to: Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food

So Itchy!Many of our pets are itchy, and often it can be related to allergies to pollens and things in the environment. These environmental allergies, called atopy, can sometimes be managed at home with washing and antihistamines. If your pets allergies seem to be seasonal, washing the feet and antihistamines may help.

If you want to try over the counter Benadryl. The active ingredient to look for is Diphenhydramine HCL. You should avoid other active ingredients  and sugar free formulas (xylitol can be toxic.)

The dose of Diphenhydramine is 1 mg per pound. So a 12 pound dog could take 12mg. If you have a 12.5 mg tablet, you could use that. If you have a liquid formula that is 12.5 mg per teaspoon, you could give 1 teaspoon. If it is not that simple, or if you are terrible at math, ask your veterinarian.  If Benadryl and feet washing do not help, there are many other forms of treatment available, just talk to your veterinarian.

Here’s the link to the study feeding extra fat to drug-sniffing dogs. Our Pets in the News segment revealed a study that showed that less protein and more fat improved their sense of smell, and helped increase their exercise tolerance.

Here’s some more info on Oscar the cat who could sense when people would pass in a nursing home, as well as dogs trained to smell melanomas.

Benadryl Dose Chart

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Listen to: Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food

 

 

Episode 10: Cloning Your Pet, Stem Cells, and the future of Copy-Cats

Rainbow and her Clone, CC (AP)

Rainbow and her Clone, CC (AP)

We all love our pets- wouldn’t it be great if they could live forever? Cloning seems to offer this- exact duplicates that can be virtually xeroxed over and over as long we want. The reality does not live up the dream, and cloning seems not quite ready for prime time.

Stem cell therapy offers more hope. It is being used now for arthritis, and research in being done on many other disease. Dr. Rumore and John discuss how it is a great new technology, but not a reason to purposefully get fat, even though the adult stems cells are harvested from fatty tissue.

Here’s the links we promised, including Dolly the Sheep and more information and the now defunct Genetic Savings and Clone. Additionally, here are pictures of the first cloned dog, as well as some more information about Rainbow, and her daughter/clone CC. Lastly, we discussed a little about calico cats and how their colors form- here’s some more info about calicos.

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Listen to: Episode 10: Cloning Your Pet, Stem Cells, and the future of Copy-Cats

Episode 9: Skinny Cats and Fat Dogs: Thyroid Disease and Your Pet’s Real Age

Thin hyperthyroid cat- thanks Dr. Mark Peterson

Thin hyperthyroid cat- thanks Dr. Mark Peterson

 

Not His Ideal Weight

Not His Ideal Weight

A cat eats a bunch but still loses weight, starts yowling in the middle of the night, and then goes blind. A dog eats very little, but keeps gaining weight, drinking way too much, with a poor hair coat and weakness in their hind end. It’s the Jack Sprat and his wife of veterinary medicine- thyroid disease. Cats (usually) produce too much thyroid hormone, while dogs produce too little. John and Dr. Rumore discuss some symptoms and treatments, as well as why some people can’t tell when their pets go blind and how veterinary school induces disease. We also discus why the “7 years for every human year” is wrong for younger pets, why flame retardants may be a big problem, and how much it hurts to step on legos.

If you are a regular listener, you may have caught us. We reversed episode 8 and 9. Was it an accident, or a secret code that leads to a treasure and the secret of the universe? I guess you will see…

Here’s some more information about hyperthyroidism cats

And some about hypothyroidism in dog

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Listen to: Episode 9: Skinny Cats and Fat Dogs: Thyroid Disease and Your Pet’s Real Age

Episode 8: Terrible Food Labels, Knee Replacements and 3-D Printers

Dr. Rumore and John talk about how completely pathetic pet food labels are, and how you can be easily fooled into paying extra money for empty words. Some of useless words include:

Pet Food Label Trickery

Premium,” “Holistic,” “Human-Grade“: These have no actual meaning, and can legally be put on ANY pet food

Natural“: means not synthetic, it does NOT mean organic. Synthetic vitamins are still allowed with this label.

with” and “flavored“: can mean a small, or even minuscule amount

100%“: means 95%

Grain-Free“; is only important for a very few pets. Most pets with food allergies are allergic to a type of meat, not a type of grain

Made in the USA“: can still be made of foreign ingredients, as long as they were mixed together in the United States

Real Meat“: organ meat (by-products) are a much more natural source of nutrition for pets than white chicken breast. “Meat” is important because it appeals to a pet’s owner, not because it is better for the pet

Order of Ingredients: is commonly tampered with by using dried products or components.

Dr. Rumore and John also discuss how 3-D printers may change the way we treat our pet’s joints, and how this makes getting pet insurance a good idea

 

Useless Pet Food Label Words Useless Pet Food Label Words

 

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Listen to Episode 8: Terrible Food Labels, Knees and 3-D Printers

Episode 7: The Skinny on Rawhides, Catnip, Isaac Hayes and How Much Space Your Dog May Need

Rawhide_Catnip

Thanks to DustJelly on Flickr and Narwhaler.com

Rawhides can be controversial; pet owners, and even veterinarians, are divided on whether they are awesome or horrible. We jump in to what exactly is a rawhide? How it may be a great treat for most dogs, but which ones should avoid it, and what you should avoid when you are shopping. We also discuss catnip, whether it is bad or addictive, and when it can be useful. Also, why you should never use catnip in a young kitten or a rat (for very different reasons). Lastly, John talks about getting a dog, which up brings up how much space a dog needs, and why some smaller dogs need more space than giant breeds.

Here’s the theme from Shaft

And Here’s the theme from Rawhide, the television show

 

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Listen to Episode 7: The Skinny on Rawhides, Catnip, Isaac Hayes and How Much Space Your Dog May Need

Episode 6: Babies, Puppies, Kittens and It’s (probably) Not Ear Mites

Coconut loves her little girls, Mia and Gianna

Coconut loves her little girls, Mia and Gianna

Doctor Rumore has a new baby, Mia Rosabella, and his young white deaf boxer Coconut has an unexpectedly good reaction. We discuss how adult dogs and cats are supposed to treat puppies, kittens and babies, and why sometimes they do not always get along as well as we would hope. Also, why buying pet store ear mite medicine for your dog and cat is probably a big waste of money and effort. Additionally, it could be a waste of perfectly good fingers, because cats tend to really dislike ear drops.

Ear Mites on YouTube

Ear Mites on YouTube

Mia, Gianna and Coconut

Mia, Gianna and Coconut

 

 

 

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Listen to Episode 6: New Babies, Puppies and Kittens and Why It Is Probably NOT Ear Mites

Episode 5: Pet Alzheimer’s and Shedding

OlderCat

John and Michael discuss the symptoms of Senior Cognitive Dysfunction, also called Dog Alzheimer’s or Cat Senility, and how supplements, antioxidants or medications may help, as well as how your pet’s brain is protected from their own blood. We also discuss why some pets shed, and others need haircuts, and the bad news about preventing shedding.

Here’s a link about the antioxidant that was mentioned, Astaxanthin, which otherwise would be impossible to spell.

Also, Dr. Rumore did a brief terrible rendition of the National Geographic them song- here’s the real deal.
OlderCat

Lastly, here’s a more information about the blood brain barrier that was mentioned. It’s a little technical but has some cool animation.

 

 

 

 

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Listen to Episode 5: Pet Alzheimer’s and Shedding

Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies

Fleas and Aliens are surprisingly similar

Fleas and Aliens are surprisingly similar

No one can argue that the 1979 movie Alien is a true classic. One of the creepiest scenes is recreated on a smaller scale in people’s homes everyday  We learn this week how you can recreate a scene from the iconic science fiction/horror movie in your own house, and then what to do to get rid of the invaders. We also discuss the most important nutrient to look for when feeding your soon-to-be-big puppy, or rather what should be missing. If you are feeding regular puppy food, you MUST listen to this episode.

We couldn’t find a link to an Aliens clip, so here is a clip of a similar scene from the [lesser] Aliens vs. Predators. It’s not a clip for kids.

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Listen to Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies

Episode 3: Jealousy , Dominance, and Telling Time

Jealousy is never pretty

Jealousy is never pretty

Everyone talks about their pets being jealous, but can they really be “jealous?” The answer will be surprising, and may change the way you give out treats to your own pack. We also discuss how dominance between pets is more complicated than you think, and when you should or shouldn’t worry.  Have you noticed how your cat always knows exactly what time dinner is? We discuss how dogs and cats tell time without looking at their watch or cell phone, and how a group of scientists tattooing ducks helped us figure that out.

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Episode 2: Litter Box Mysteries and The Joy of Toys

The Joy of the Litterbox A cat can be mysterious about many things, but few mysteries are more frustrating than why the darn cat has stopped using the litter box. We dive a little deeper into what cats really want in a bathroom (for example, not feeling like they are trapped in a elevator with someone wearing too much perfume) and give some tips on what to try. For those good little puppies and kittens who are not getting coal in their stockings, we mention some fun dog and cat toys. Lastly, John and Dr. Rumore discuss how pets do NOT make good surprise gifts.

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Listen to: Episode 2: Litter Box Mysteries and the Joy of Toys

 

Episode 1: Alien Invaders from Planet Earth

Sometimes danger comes in small packages. Sometimes those small packages grow up to be giant freakin’ toads that eat everything and squirt poison! No, it’s not a grade-b late night movie; it is real life for southern states. If you have pets, you need to know how to identify a Bufo toad, where these scary critters came from, and what to do if your dog or cat catches one. It could save your pet’s life!

Read more about pets and the bufo toad on Dr. Rumore’s Blog.

Here’s the link we mentioned to the University of Florida’s guide to identifying Bufo Toads and the recommendations for how to humanely dispatch them.

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Listen to:  Episode 1: Alien Invaders- the Cane Toad

Woof woof and Meow!

Welcome to PetAnswers! Dr. Michael Rumore, voted one of the top 5 most popular veterinarians in the United States, and award winning talk journalist John Sipos, come together in a regular podcast to discuss the inside story of your pets. We dive a little deeper, for those dog and cat owners who not only notice that there pet knows what time dinner is served, but also want to know why. We think pets are fascinating just like you do. So join us in the PetAnswers podcast, and learn something about your four legged family member. Perhaps as you understand them, you may even love them just a little bit more, if that is even possible.