Archives for May 2013

Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Dog Eating GrassSome dogs and cats seem almost obsessive about eating grass. John and Dr, Rumore discuss why, whether you need to worry about it, and how to slow them down if your pets love of lawn salad is getting too excessive.

If you are trying to add some fiber to your pet’s diet, dogs tend to like canned green beans, carrots (fresh, frozen and canned), romaine leaves, or apples. Avoid garlic and onions, as they can cause anemia is dogs and cats.

We talk a fair amount about herbicides and cancer risks in dogs. If you want more information:

Here is the link to the Purdue study that shows the bladder cancer risk with herbicides and Scotties.

Here is the link to an article about the herbicide 24D and cancer in dogs.

Here is the link to the response from the manufacturer of 24D, refuting the cancer study.

The ASPCA Poison Control Center has much information about which plants in your house and yard may be toxic.

Cat Eating Grass

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Listen to: Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

No Visine for PetsWhat it means when your pet has goopy eyes, and what you can do at home, and when you need to get to veterinarian as soon as possible. Things never to use- contact lens cleaner, Visine, ClearEyes or similar in your pet’s eyes. We talk about entropion and ectropion, both are disorders of the eyelids. We also discuss Keratoconjuctiva Sicca (dry eye) and how to properly treat Cherry Eyes.

Some pictures of eyes are coming- if injured eyes gross you out, you have been warned!

Entropion (Thanks Wikipedia!) The eyelashes are rubbing on the eyeball, causing the eye to turn blue and brown with irritation.

Ectropion in a Cocker Spaniel (thanks Wikipedia). The eyelids are drooping too low, preventing this dog from blinking properly.

Cherry Eye- Don’t Cut that Off! The tear gland of the third eyelid is inflamed and prolapsed.

Dr. Rumore’s wife finds a lost beagle, and the importance of microchips, and registering them, is highlighted. If you need to find out which company maintains your pet’s microchip registry, you can look it here.

Microchip and Rice Grain- From How Stuff Works

John changes his name from John Siposawardwinningtalkjournalist to Johnny Edge, or maybe Shannon. We also discuss how to say “shmushed up face” in latin (brachiocephalic).

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Listen to: Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food

So Itchy!Many of our pets are itchy, and often it can be related to allergies to pollens and things in the environment. These environmental allergies, called atopy, can sometimes be managed at home with washing and antihistamines. If your pets allergies seem to be seasonal, washing the feet and antihistamines may help.

If you want to try over the counter Benadryl. The active ingredient to look for is Diphenhydramine HCL. You should avoid other active ingredients  and sugar free formulas (xylitol can be toxic.)

The dose of Diphenhydramine is 1 mg per pound. So a 12 pound dog could take 12mg. If you have a 12.5 mg tablet, you could use that. If you have a liquid formula that is 12.5 mg per teaspoon, you could give 1 teaspoon. If it is not that simple, or if you are terrible at math, ask your veterinarian.  If Benadryl and feet washing do not help, there are many other forms of treatment available, just talk to your veterinarian.

Here’s the link to the study feeding extra fat to drug-sniffing dogs. Our Pets in the News segment revealed a study that showed that less protein and more fat improved their sense of smell, and helped increase their exercise tolerance.

Here’s some more info on Oscar the cat who could sense when people would pass in a nursing home, as well as dogs trained to smell melanomas.

Benadryl Dose Chart

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Listen to: Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food

 

 

Episode 10: Cloning Your Pet, Stem Cells, and the future of Copy-Cats

Rainbow and her Clone, CC (AP)

Rainbow and her Clone, CC (AP)

We all love our pets- wouldn’t it be great if they could live forever? Cloning seems to offer this- exact duplicates that can be virtually xeroxed over and over as long we want. The reality does not live up the dream, and cloning seems not quite ready for prime time.

Stem cell therapy offers more hope. It is being used now for arthritis, and research in being done on many other disease. Dr. Rumore and John discuss how it is a great new technology, but not a reason to purposefully get fat, even though the adult stems cells are harvested from fatty tissue.

Here’s the links we promised, including Dolly the Sheep and more information and the now defunct Genetic Savings and Clone. Additionally, here are pictures of the first cloned dog, as well as some more information about Rainbow, and her daughter/clone CC. Lastly, we discussed a little about calico cats and how their colors form- here’s some more info about calicos.

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Listen to: Episode 10: Cloning Your Pet, Stem Cells, and the future of Copy-Cats