Episode 17: Drug Reactions, The News, and It May NOT be Hip Dysplasia

MicrophoneDr. Rumore gets interviewed, and blatantly taken out of context, when interviewed by his local news station. The issue involved dru reactions and Trifexis, and just goes to show how what you read online, or see on television, may not be the whole truth.

Update: WFLA has edited their original story online, and removed the out-of context quote. Thanks!!

Here’s the story.

John also asks about the trifecta, which is a bet in horseracing, and not a heartworm preventative.

John and Dr. Rumore also discuss hip dysplasia, and the tings that can look very similar. We all think of arthirits in the hips of big dogs, but  90% of cats over the age of 12 have arthritis.  They also discuss how long term aspirin use may make arthritis worse, but Chondroiton and Glucosamine can help. Stem cell therapy and hip replacements can help as well, but are much more expensive.

Using pill guns to give pills to cats was mentioned, as well as thyroid disease in Dr. Rumore’s cat Scully, and how cat’s may maintain their muscle mass by purring.

They also discussed the placebo effect, and how it makes testimonials a bad way to judge supplements.

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Episode 16: The 8 Things You Need to Do for Your Pet This Summer

ecoverusblog-com

Thanks EcoverUSBlog.com

1. Warmer temperatures can lead to scary weather. Be ready if you must evacuate or hunker down for a storm. Have food, water and a way to contain your pets handy if needed. And please, please, please REGISTER YOUR FREAKIN’ MICROCHIP!

2. Please get them on a heartworm prevention, and make sure what you are using is effective against heartworms.

3. Be ready for allergies as the pollens start to bloom. See Episode 11: Itchy Allergies, Benadryl Doses, and Protein Levels in Pet Food for some hints on how to deal with allergies.

4. Start your flea prevention before they hit hard. See how fleas mimic the movie Aliens in Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies.

Once again, where dogs who have fleas typically itch

Once again, where dogs who have fleas typically itch

 

Where cats who have fleas typically itch

Where cats who have fleas typically itch

5. Be careful of poisonous critters, such as rattlesnakes and bufo toads.  We mention the rattlesnake vaccine, and some of the controversy surrounding it.

6. Pools can be dangerous for kids and pets. Make sure your pet has a way to get out of your pool, such as a ramp.  We also discussed rhabdomyolysis.(your big word for the day).

7. The heat can be deadly. Dogs and cats can only sweat through their footpads and nose, so heatstroke is much more likely in a hot car. We also mentioned Mexican Hairless dogs and Sphinx cats.

8. Antifreeze can be deadly– be careful with flushing or leaks.

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Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Dog Eating GrassSome dogs and cats seem almost obsessive about eating grass. John and Dr, Rumore discuss why, whether you need to worry about it, and how to slow them down if your pets love of lawn salad is getting too excessive.

If you are trying to add some fiber to your pet’s diet, dogs tend to like canned green beans, carrots (fresh, frozen and canned), romaine leaves, or apples. Avoid garlic and onions, as they can cause anemia is dogs and cats.

We talk a fair amount about herbicides and cancer risks in dogs. If you want more information:

Here is the link to the Purdue study that shows the bladder cancer risk with herbicides and Scotties.

Here is the link to an article about the herbicide 24D and cancer in dogs.

Here is the link to the response from the manufacturer of 24D, refuting the cancer study.

The ASPCA Poison Control Center has much information about which plants in your house and yard may be toxic.

Cat Eating Grass

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Listen to: Episode 13: Why Your Pet Is Eating Grass

Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

No Visine for PetsWhat it means when your pet has goopy eyes, and what you can do at home, and when you need to get to veterinarian as soon as possible. Things never to use- contact lens cleaner, Visine, ClearEyes or similar in your pet’s eyes. We talk about entropion and ectropion, both are disorders of the eyelids. We also discuss Keratoconjuctiva Sicca (dry eye) and how to properly treat Cherry Eyes.

Some pictures of eyes are coming- if injured eyes gross you out, you have been warned!

Entropion (Thanks Wikipedia!) The eyelashes are rubbing on the eyeball, causing the eye to turn blue and brown with irritation.

Ectropion in a Cocker Spaniel (thanks Wikipedia). The eyelids are drooping too low, preventing this dog from blinking properly.

Cherry Eye- Don’t Cut that Off! The tear gland of the third eyelid is inflamed and prolapsed.

Dr. Rumore’s wife finds a lost beagle, and the importance of microchips, and registering them, is highlighted. If you need to find out which company maintains your pet’s microchip registry, you can look it here.

Microchip and Rice Grain- From How Stuff Works

John changes his name from John Siposawardwinningtalkjournalist to Johnny Edge, or maybe Shannon. We also discuss how to say “shmushed up face” in latin (brachiocephalic).

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Listen to: Episode 12: Goopy Eyes, and Why Half of All Microchips are Useless

Episode 9: Skinny Cats and Fat Dogs: Thyroid Disease and Your Pet’s Real Age

Thin hyperthyroid cat- thanks Dr. Mark Peterson

Thin hyperthyroid cat- thanks Dr. Mark Peterson

 

Not His Ideal Weight

Not His Ideal Weight

A cat eats a bunch but still loses weight, starts yowling in the middle of the night, and then goes blind. A dog eats very little, but keeps gaining weight, drinking way too much, with a poor hair coat and weakness in their hind end. It’s the Jack Sprat and his wife of veterinary medicine- thyroid disease. Cats (usually) produce too much thyroid hormone, while dogs produce too little. John and Dr. Rumore discuss some symptoms and treatments, as well as why some people can’t tell when their pets go blind and how veterinary school induces disease. We also discus why the “7 years for every human year” is wrong for younger pets, why flame retardants may be a big problem, and how much it hurts to step on legos.

If you are a regular listener, you may have caught us. We reversed episode 8 and 9. Was it an accident, or a secret code that leads to a treasure and the secret of the universe? I guess you will see…

Here’s some more information about hyperthyroidism cats

And some about hypothyroidism in dog

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Listen to: Episode 9: Skinny Cats and Fat Dogs: Thyroid Disease and Your Pet’s Real Age

Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies

Fleas and Aliens are surprisingly similar

Fleas and Aliens are surprisingly similar

No one can argue that the 1979 movie Alien is a true classic. One of the creepiest scenes is recreated on a smaller scale in people’s homes everyday  We learn this week how you can recreate a scene from the iconic science fiction/horror movie in your own house, and then what to do to get rid of the invaders. We also discuss the most important nutrient to look for when feeding your soon-to-be-big puppy, or rather what should be missing. If you are feeding regular puppy food, you MUST listen to this episode.

We couldn’t find a link to an Aliens clip, so here is a clip of a similar scene from the [lesser] Aliens vs. Predators. It’s not a clip for kids.

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Listen to Episode 4: Horror Movies, Fleas and Feeding Big Puppies